Care for Grandparents

Adult children have the responsibility of caring for parents and sometimes grandparents.  Caregiving at home is a huge responsibility.  It is both selfless and thoughtful to take on the care of a loved one.  What about when it becomes too much?  What happens when the home health care agency recommends that your loved one seek more comprehensive care?

If your family is considering a facility for your loved one, here are 16 core questions to ask:

  1. What is affordable for your family? Does the facility accept the relative’s health insurance? Has the relative set aside savings for his or her care?
  2. How clean is the facility?
  3. Is there a robust social calendar? Relationships are vital for older adult health and wellness.
  4. Are there opportunities for physical activity?
  5. Is there a shuttle to take your relative to their medical appointments?
  6. What are the staff’s qualifications?
  7. Is the facility certified by the state? Older adult care is highly regulated.
  8. What were the past inspection reports? Cases of elder abuse? Any cleanliness issues? Any physical modifications needed to reduce onsite injuries?
  9. How often do they check on patients? Have there been cases of bed sores? Tough to prove, but important to at least inquire.
  10. Does the care align with the relative’s needs? Some patients that can’t take care of themselves do not require actual clinical assistance. Ensure you’re not paying for more services than needed.
  11. If medical care is needed, does the facility offer the specialized care required?
  12. Are there nurse call buttons in cases where resident rooms are independent and remote?
  13. What’s the daily menu for patients/residents?
  14. Do the current residents or patients seem satisfied and happy. Is it a bright and well lit environment?
  15. How does the facility tailor care based on the resident’s or patients mobility?
  16. Is there daily time outside? Fresh air and sun promote good health.
We must plan ahead and consider questions to ask the nursing home or assisted living facility to make sure they are well taken care of if they cannot take care of themselves.